Healthy Environment, Healthy Community, Healthy Business

Environment Protection Authority

Environmental Issues

Waste and recycling

Gathering and interpreting illegal dumping data

Illegal dumping case study – RailCorp hotspot register

RailCorp implemented an Illegal Waste Dumping Register for several of its City Rail sectors impacted by illegal waste dumping. The register contains information about illegal dumping within station precincts (including carparks and bus interchanges). The register did not include the rail corridor because management structures and maintenance regimes differ for these locations. Prior to the development of the register, very little was known about the type, origin or frequency of waste dumped at stations within the City Rail sectors.

Benefits of a hotspot register

An Illegal Waste Dumping Register is helping RailCorp manage illegal dumping within station precincts. Photo: courtesy RailCorp.

An Illegal Waste Dumping Register is helping RailCorp manage illegal dumping within station precincts. Photo: courtesy RailCorp.

The register has helped RailCorp managers to identify waste dumping hotspots and develop an integrated and consistent approach to reducing and managing incidents of illegal waste dumping within station precincts. Hotspots are now more closely monitored and inspections of the hotspots are undertaken as part of daily station duties.

Some hotspots are partly owned or managed by RailCorp and local councils, so routine inspection and clean-up arrangements have been made in partnership with councils or other relevant authorities.

Information gathered by the register has improved knowledge of hotspots and the type of waste dumped. Knowledge gained from the register has helped RailCorp make informed decisions for monitoring, reporting, cleaning up and disposing of illegally dumped waste. It has also helped to identify partnerships for collaborative action to tackle illegal dumping with local councils.

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Page last updated: 14 January 2015